Issue III+IV/2018 - Poorest nation, richest nation

Poorest nation, richest nation (Issue III+IV/2018)




A country sinks into violence

a photo series by William Daniels

Utter poverty amid a wealth of resources has been the reality in the Central African Republic for decades. How did the country become the poorest in the world even though it abounds with gold, diamonds and uranium?

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Everyday life in the richest country in the world

a photo series by

Where fifty years ago Bedouins roamed the desert, today skyscrapers tower into the sky. In Qatar, extremes are the norm, with wealth next to bitter poverty, modernity alongside tradition

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Editorial

Editorial

by Jenny Friedrich-Freksa

Our chief editor takes a look at the current issue.

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Tomorrow's world

Self-sustaining snails

Short news from Antarctica

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A vegetable a day

Short news from Brazil. 

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Employing the disabled

Short news from Senegal

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From country to city

Short news from Estonia.

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Rubbish for the Doctor

Short news from Indonesia.

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Cultural spots

The Maunsell Sea Forts

by Stephen Turner

Look out to sea from the Thames Estuary in the south-east of Britain on a fine day, and you can see small dots in the distance. They look like the anchors of giant ships. 

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What's different elsewhere

Holy Antelopes

by Kumar Prashant

According to Hindu mythology, in the beginning of the world, there was a great cosmic something that split into two: a male part and a female part. Both of these parts then produced all other existing beings, in pairs.

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Communal Dinner on Sundays

by Falefatu Tamotu

There is a special ritual on Sundays in Samoa: We come together as a family and we prepare our umu, our earth oven. 

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The talk of the town in ...

... Hong Kong

by Donald Lee Lap Tak

Since March, all of Hong Kong has been debating the local culture around overtime. After a bus driver working for the KMB bus company caused an accident that killed 12 because he was overtired, it came out that he had been working for over 12 hours straight. 

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How I became me

A Poet and a Cosmopolitan

by Jonas Mekas

As a child I lay in the fields in my small Lithuanian village and dreamed of somewhere else. Ninety years later I am sitting in Brooklyn and asking myself: Why am I no longer there, in the fields of my childhood?

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A house in ...

... Oman

by Kai Schnier

The Al Jafaari’s family home is Al Ashkharah, an Omani fishing village.

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Topic: Inequality

Preventing Cities From Collapsing

a conversation with Aisa Kirabo Kacyira

More than half the world’s population lives in urban areas, pushing questions of equality and justice to the top of the international agenda

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“They Firmly Believe in the Future“

an interview with Karen Abbs

How do people deal with extreme insecurity and how can they be helped? An interview with Karen Abbs, an expert on crisis regions

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Bangui the Terrible

by Adrienne Yabouza

Terrorist attacks, armed robbery, water scarcity: Everyday life in the capital of the Central African Republic is hard. And yet people here are safer than in the rest of the country.

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Closed Society

by Khalid Albaih

Qatar's capital Doha is home to people from across the world  - but they live completely separate lives. 

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Reforming the Nation

by Loay Mudhoon

Qatar is piling into arts and culture. Long underpinned by its oil production, the wealthy nation has decided that in the future it no longer wants to live from crude alone. 

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Power Struggles in the Gulf

by Christopher Davidson

More than a year ago Qatar's neighbours imposed an embargo on the tiny state. What has happened since? 

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“Our Reality Is Funny Enough”

by Hamad Al-Amari

What do people in Qatar laugh about? Comedian Hamad Al-Amari explores his countrymen’s humour.

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Woman at the Wheel

by Nada Zeidan

From breaking taboos to becoming an idol: The first female rally driver in the Arab world recounts how she discovered motor sports and learnt how to assert herself in a male domain.

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Blood-Soaked Soil

by Judicaël-Ulrich Boukanga Serpende

Our country is plagued by a never-ending cycle of violence. But how have people learned to deal with the omnipresence of death?

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“A Few Profit, the Rest Go Hungry”

by James Shikwati

Kenyan economist James Shikwati believes that the Central African Republic's problems mirror those of the whole continent. Despite this, he still has high hopes for the country. He explains why in an interview.

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Poor in Qatar, Rich in the Central African Republic: The €350 Starvation Wage

by Vani Saraswathi

Around 88 percent of those working in Qatar are migrant labourers. Bal Krishna Gautham is one of them.

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Poor in Qatar, Rich in the Central African Republic: The Billionaire of Boy-Rabe

by Beaumont Karnou

It’s no coincidence that one of the richest men in the Central African Republic is a politician. His name is Fidèle Gouandjika and he was a former Minister of Communications here. He likes to describe himself as “the billionaire of Boy-Rabe”. 

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“I am an Optimist”

an interview with Moussa Abdoulaye

How does politics function in a crisis-torn state? Moussa Abdoulaye, special advisor to the Prime Minister, describes his day job.

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Putin's Game Plan

by Jack Losh

Once central Africa was in the grip of western colonial powers. Today Russia is using the region to restore and amplify its political clout.

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Ungovernable

by Josué Kanabo

Why the Central African Republic's weak government is one of its biggest problems.

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Doha's Mouthpiece

by Hazem Saghieh

For a long time, Al Jazeera was touted as a beacon of hope for Arab journalism - until the Qatari media outlet was gradually subsumed by politics.

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The Citizens’ Radio

by Sylvie Panika

Journalists who report the truth in the Central African Republic are putting their lives on the line. The editor-in-chief of Radio Ndeke Luka explains why.

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We Are Mothers, We Are Angry

by Marie-Thérèse Boubande

Women in the Central African Republic are managing to gain the respect of armed militias - and are steering them towards reconciliation.

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Escape Plans

by Kai Schnier

How do you encourage child soldiers to lay down their weapons? In central Africa, NGOs are using simply illustrated flyers and targeted radio broadcasts.

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“We Wanted to Celebrate the Books”

by Ellen van Loon

Qatar is pumping money into education and has built a spanking new Education City district. The Dutch architect Ellen Van Loon, together with Rem Kohlhaas, has created a new library for the city.

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The Land That Never Was

by Blaise N'Djehoya

First a bank spot on the map, then a colony: How Ubangi-Shari became the Central African Republic.

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In God’s Name

by Michaël Eustache Mounzatela

On why it is actually not religious differences that are dividing the Christians and Muslims of the Central African Republic. 

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Sports and Politics

by Liudmila Kotlyarova

The next World Cup kicks off in Qatar in 2022 and the small nation is betting on the highly-anticipated sporting event to boost its international standing.

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The Marriage Proposal

by Georgette Florence Koyt-Deballé

Extract from "Nago et sa grand-mère" (Copyright: L'Harmattan, Paris, 2017).

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World report

Japanese Only

by Pallavi Aiyar

The myth of the population's racial purity has prevented Japan from starting a long overdue discussion about racism.

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What Remains of Hungary

by György Dalos

In 1920 the country lost a third of its population through the Treaty of Trianon - that has left a lasting trauma.

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In theory

Cracker and White Hat Hacker

by Benjamin Peters

A bitter fight for influence is underway in cyberspace and Russian hackers are centre stage. But we still think of them in terms of stereotypes - and with a large pinch of imagination.

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In practice

The Jungle in the Dome

by Dilay Avci

Refugees and volunteers from 24 nations are on the road with their unique theatre show - and take their own stage wherever they travel.

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Survey

21% of Ukrainians Believe That LGBT Rights Don’t Deserve Legal Protection*

commented by Inga Pylypchuk

At first glance, 21 percent seems like a lot. But the picture is not complete unless one takes into account other numbers too.

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A phone call with ...

a comedienne: Is the #MeTwo movement mostly about isolated cases?

commented by Idil Baydar

No, these so-called isolated cases reveal a structure and one can see how our society is organised. 

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I think that ...

… We Should Make the European Court of Human Rights Stronger

commented by Peter Steudtner

The human rights activist had to spend 113 days in Turkish custody. He argues why a stronger ECHR would help in situations like this.

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Books

Who Is We?

by Rokhaya Diallo

So many people are increasingly speaking in the name of "We" in public. The French philosopher Tristan Garcia discusses how these identities of the "We" can be reconciled.

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"Distance Offers Me Protection"

by Chinelo Okparanta

Homosexuality remains a big taboo in Nigeria. With her lesbian love story Chinelo Okparanta chips away at prejudice.

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Sitting at the Big Table

by Daniel Bax

Their parents were reticent but now the children and grandchildren of immigrants to Germany want to have their say. In his book, The Integration Paradox, author Aladin El-Mafaalani describes the conflicts that ensue - and why this could be a good sign.

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The Most Lofty and the Most Base of Feelings

by Carmen Eller

In "The First Garment" Guram Dochanashvili describes life in times of political tyranny.

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