Dunhuang crescent moon lake

by He Yulei

Earth, how are you doing? (Issue I/2018)


The crescent moon is like a mysterious dream. It lies on the edge of the Kumtag Desert in western China and has not been buried by sand for thousands of years, nor does it evaporate from the heat. It is named after its shape and surrounded by the Mingsha Mountains, which are also called singing dunes. On bright days the dunes "sing", sometimes they sound like thunder, sometimes like violins or woodwind instruments. The dunes, which change their height permanently depending on the humidity, consist of grains of sand in five different colours: red, golden, green, black and white.

Old historical texts and manuscripts from the nearby Mogao caves prove that miraculous powers have been attributed to the place since the third century BC. There are different legends about the lake’s origins. Some say that it was created by God and brings health, healing and a long life. At the foot of the dunes are the ruins of a temple in honour of the god of spring. The lake is currently 100 meters long and 25 meters wide from north to south, measuring five meters at its deepest point. However, the water level is lower than twenty years ago.

Translated by Jess Smee



similar articles

Heroes (Topic: Heroes)

Do it like Lei!

by Falk Hartig

The much-hyped soldier Lei Feng has been dead for over fifty years but to this day, the Communist Party of China continues to tout him as a moral role model.

more


Heroes (Cultural spots)

The root bridges of Nongsohphan

by Amos Chapple

Any wooden bridge would quickly rot in the damp north Indian jungle. That's why, for hundreds of years, locals have simply grown bridges out of the trees.

more


Am Mittelmeer. Menschen auf neuen Wegen (Cultural spots)

The Kukulkan pyramid in Chichén Itzá

by Julián Herbert

"El Castillo" ("the castle"), the famous Kukulkan pyramid of the ruins of Chichén Itzá, I saw for the first time a few days after I decided not to be young anymore.

more


Taboo (I think that)

... we should be more critical about China's role in Africa

By Basma Abdel Aziz

On the African continent, Chinese investors are buying up infrastructure on a massive scale. A plea for more criticism.

more


Taboo (World report)

Culture on all channels

by Doris Akrap

The Covid-19 pandemic has unleashed massive restrictions on global cultural relations. How cultural institutes are facing unprecedented challenges.

more


Earth, how are you doing? (Tomorrow's world)

Jambon for China!

Short news from Spain. 

more