73% of Indians Trust Narendra Modi*

commented by Shirin Rai

Earth, how are you doing? (Issue I/2018)


 In essence, Modi's policy -- and that of the Indian People's Party (BJP) -- boils down to Hindu nationalism. His motto is "Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas", which means "one government for all, development for all". In truth, Modi wants to create an India where religious minorities bow to the will of the Hindu majority. Since his reign started there has been a rise in Hindu violent attacks on Christians and Muslims and more arson attacks on churches and mosques. Modi tends to keep quiet on such topics, just as he kept quiet in 2002, during his stint as Chief Minister of the State of Gujarat, when Hindus committed pogroms, murdering nearly 800 Muslims. His ongoing popularity largely boils down to his rhetorical skills and ability at self promotion. Modi - like Donald Trump in the U.S. - likes to present himself as an economic expert. That has prompted many people to trust him, especially in his fight against corruption.

*Source: OECD - Government at a Glance 2017



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