... Adjumani

by Ochan Hannington

Earth, how are you doing? (Issue I/2018)


More and more investors are pushing into the region and building large quantities of wood of the rainforest. Increasingly, the locals fear for their livelihood. The tense situation has triggered violent conflicts between the two tribes. Dozens of Acholi and Madi were recently killed in an attempt to defend their businesses and homes.

Adding to the uncertainty, last year the National Forestry Administration claimed some areas. Residents are wondering what the government plans to do: claim the land for themselves or resell it to investors known for enforcing relocation without adequate compensation. In addition, Adjumani borders on South Sudan and the many civil war refugees from there add to the pressure on scarce resources.



similar articles

The hunters and the hunted (Books)

The end of the uprising

By Amira El Ahl

Ten years ago, the world watched the Arab Spring with bated breath. In his new book, journalist Jörg Armbruster chronicles what is left of the revolution.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (Tomorrow's world)

Going green, literally

Short news from China.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (Cultural spots)

The Maunsell Sea Forts

by Stephen Turner

Look out to sea from the Thames Estuary in the south-east of Britain on a fine day, and you can see small dots in the distance. They look like the anchors of giant ships. 

more


Nonstop (Books)

Trapped in Sarajevo

by Doris Akrap

Damir Ovcina‘s novel forces the reader to bear witness to the Bosnian genocide.

more


Nonstop (Survey)

53% of Sri Lankans would like to see a stronger focus on dealing with legacies of the civil war*

commented by Dilrukshi Handunnetti

A decade after Sri Lanka’s war came to an end, genuine power sharing between the two main communities, the Sinhalese and Tamils, remains illusive.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (How I became me)

A poet and a cosmopolitan

by Jonas Mekas

As a child I lay in the fields in my small Lithuanian village and dreamed of somewhere else. Ninety years later I am sitting in Brooklyn and asking myself: Why am I no longer there, in the fields of my childhood?

more