Poor in Qatar, rich in the Central African Republic: The billionaire of Boy-Rabe

by Beaumont Karnou

Poorest nation, richest nation (Issue III+IV/2018)


Boy-Rabe is the neighbourhood in the Central African capital, Bangui, where Gouandjika grew up and where he now owns a lot of real estate, including a five star hotel. As the former director of the telecommunications company, Socatel, he was involved in a number of scandals. He embezzled money from the business and it ended up in his own pocket. While many people in his country are starving, Gouandjika is happy to be chauffeured around the Bangui streets in his American limousine. Like many other politicians here, he is far too accustomed to abundance. 



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