Big business

Heroes (Issue II/2018)


The smallest population group in Niger makes the biggest deals: immigrants from northern Africa, account for less than one percent of the country's population but controls sixty percent of the industry and ninety percent of the transport sector. Most long-distance bus lines are in their hands. The Arab minority also holds shares in airlines and numerous factories in the country. The Arabs' economic success followed the government's post-peace agreement integration policy.



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