Poor in Qatar, rich in the Central African Republic: The €350 starvation wage

by Vani Saraswathi

Poorest nation, richest nation (Issue III+IV/2018)


The professional painter originally comes from Nepal and he had hoped for a good life and a regular income when he immigrated to this Gulf state. But reality has caught up with his aspirations. Like many other migrant labourers in Doha, Gautham earns a pittance: Depending on the job, he makes between €150 and €350 a month. In a country where a salary of €3,000 only puts a wage earner into the lower middle income bracket, that is not enough to live on. Additionally the working conditions are bad. “When I do a  job for Qatari clients, I am often not allowed a toilet or meal break,” Gautham recounts. Like many others here, Gautham doesn’t have any set working hours and he only gets Fridays off.



similar articles

Poorest nation, richest nation (Topic: Inequality)

Putin's game plan

by Jack Losh

Once central Africa was in the grip of western colonial powers. Today Russia is using the region to restore and amplify its political clout.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (Topic: Inequality)

Escape Plans

by Kai Schnier

How do you encourage child soldiers to lay down their weapons? In central Africa, NGOs are using simply illustrated flyers and targeted radio broadcasts.

more


Une Grande Nation (World report)

Manila Calling

by Barbara Brustlein

Around a million Filipinos work in the call centre business. They answer their phones day and night, dealing with complaints and taking care of other people’s homework.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (Survey)

21% of Ukrainians Believe That LGBT Rights Don’t Deserve Legal Protection*

commented by Inga Pylypchuk

At first glance, 21 percent seems like a lot. But the picture is not complete unless one takes into account other numbers too.

more


Poorest nation, richest nation (Tomorrow's world)

Employing the disabled

Short news from Senegal

more


The better America (Topic: Canada)

A multitude of voices

by Sherry Simon

Contemporary Montreal has been shaped by a wide range of languages. A stroll through the Mile End district.

more